Anne McMahon

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • in reply to: Zoom ID number for MHANZ AGM 934 4004 8943 #4973
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Thanks Rebecca, is there a way to reverse that?

    in reply to: Zoom ID number for MHANZ AGM 934 4004 8943 #4956
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Sorry Julia and Julie, i have mailed our web providers and web committee person to try address the problem. Any updates i will post on here for the time being.

    Thanks for letting me know, Anne

    in reply to: Zoom ID number for MHANZ AGM 934 4004 8943 #4953
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Sarah

    Thats odd, you should have received your mhanz plans. Its from 14.00 to 15.00hrs Friday 22nd May. Is it possible it went to your spam?

    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: Moving unresponsive patient from chair #4704
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Eleanor
    Depending on the whole picture, you have to use your clinical judgement and assess for a faint, an arrest or other. If its a suspected arrest we teach you call for assistance, pull them to the floor manually, applying a pillow under the head if possible. That situation is life threatening and A,B, C’s come first. If you suspect it is a vaso-vagal or faint you would check ABC’s and if all good get medical assessment if concerned, or wait a few seconds, this may allow patient to come round. Either way we would hoist to the bed once patient stable.
    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: Flat sheets vs fitted bed sheets #4499
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi all
    We found through years of trial and error (in multiple areas) that a fitted sheet and a flat sheet works best for patients needing assistance with slide sheets. The patient is better protected as less chance of bare skin against the mattress. The staff have better purchase/grip using the top flat sheet with the top slide sheet. We did have some resistance re cost but in reality whats the cost of laundering an extra sheet compared to the cost of an injury to either staff, patient or both!
    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: New standing aid option #4498
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    I have to say its really worth while having a look and a play with this. Its not a sit to stand hoist, once you get your head round that, (as I had to) its easier to place the use. The video is not my favorite but working with the actual machine and proper instruction is really worth while. Richard is kindly bringing the equipment to our team day in December so the whole M&H Educator team can have a look.

    in reply to: TROPHI Workshop with Mike Fray – November 2019 #4497
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Fantastic Anthony! Looking forward to it

    in reply to: Using the molift belt #4367
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Jessie, Megan and Kate

    I agree the techniques used in this video are unsafe. The carers are using the strap handles to lift and lower the patient. No I would not advocate this technique and no I would definitely not teach it to our staff. But I think this type of equipment is great as long as its used in the right way and with the appropriately assessed patient/client. They are a great way to test and improve sit to stand ability and standing tolerance. They have a small footprint and obviously don’t need to be near a power point, making them easier for clinical and residential spaces to accommodate. But they do not replace the need for a sit to stand and/or full body hoist. If the patient cannot stand themselves onto this equipment then a higher acuity of equipment should be used.

    We train staff to use the strap only once the person is standing and to remove the strap before they sit down. We remove the moveable slide before implementation so staff are not tempted to try drag or lift anyone up. I have not seen the technique on the video used anywhere before. I have seen the strap with the slide in use but I think there is a risk that it will be used to lift the person physically. Everyone teaching M&H needs to consider as you say Jessie, A. can you do it safely and B. can you teach it and have confidence that the learner will do it safely. Transfer belts have been contentious for some time, I think for similar reasons. There is a round table discussion article in the international Journal (Int J SPHM. Volume 7, number 3, 116-121) discussing ‘gait belts’ with representatives from NZ, the UK and the US. Just FYI!

    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: Moving and Handling Conference #4294
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Meg
    Can you send that to me too please?
    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: Moving and Handling Conference #4291
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Julia
    Welcome to MHANZ.
    We run events most years that provide opportunities for updating, these usually include overseas speakers, workshops and presentations. We also encourage our members and practitioners, like yourself, to participate in the programme.
    There is a post grad certificate in Moving and Handling available at AUT, course lead is Dr Fiona Trevelyan. This is based on the curriculum from Dr Mike Fray in Loughborough University in the UK. MHANZ, Dr. Fray and ACC were integral to the introduction of this in 2015.
    There is also the Australian AAMHP (Australian Association for the Manual Handling of people http://www.aamhp.org.au/) and their next conference is September 2020 in Adelaide. We provide information on these events in our newsletter and within the website itself so have a good look around.
    Hope that helps!
    Anne

    in reply to: New Zealand Patient Handling Guidelines- review?? #4256
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Ellen
    As far as I am aware the only update was the condensing of the 2012 document for the Worksafe website. That was done a couple of years ago. Many MHANZ members delivered robust and thorough feedback to the first draft but no acknowledgement of this was given. There was no evidence of any of that feedback being integrated into the final product. I would be keen for the Guidelines to be updated, they were always intended to be a living document to evolve and develop with progress in knowledge and technology.
    If any MHANZ member is aware of this could you please post on the forum or PM me? I feel it is very important that subject matter experts, those involved and responsible for M&H programmes and the people actually doing the work, be represented in any revision.
    I will update you all if i hear anything further.
    Thanks
    Anne

    in reply to: Care giver kneeling on the floor #3940
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    My preference would be either slide sheets under the calves to reduce the friction and allow the person to pull their own legs up or using a limb sling with a hoist. The staff shouldn’t be lifting legs, it is detrimental to their and the patient safety. If the person can’t get one leg up at a time (with these aids and the right positioning) I would be questioning their ability to stand and/or walk, do they need a hoist? The positioning of the patient and the bed is crucial. Lowering the bed to an optimal level, getting the patient to the right point of the mattress, putting the back of the bed up and using any handles the bed has built in e.g. hill rom has multiple points allowing the patient to safely assist in propelling themselves backwards. Then getting the person to sit back into the middle of the mattress and bring one leg up at a time. I think often this task doesn’t need assistance when the person is instructed correctly and given the time to do it.

    Possibly the inability to get legs back onto a bed is the justification to have more automation, particularly in the home setting. A bed that is electrically height adjustable, a sit to stand aid allowing better positioning or even a ceiling hoist allowing limb assistance without making the floor space of a room unmanageable. If the patient cannot get their legs onto a bed they are likely to require some level of assistance for other tasks. The weight of legs, especially in the presentations mentioned, will be in excess of any kind of ‘safe’ load limit.

    in reply to: Single Handed Care #3924
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    I agree Kate and Julie, i am also concerned that any focus on single handed care will disadvantage rather than benefit patients and/or carers. The focus must be on what is required for the task to be performed safely and in that environment. If, as you say, a reduction of ‘bodies’ can be justified in an upgrade in facility design e.g. ceiling hoists then great but that must be a case by case and not only risk assessed but repeatedly risk assessed.

    The good news is you’ll be able to ask Deborah herself as she is joining us on the AGM day on the 3rd of May here in Auckland. A MHANZ plans is going out shortly and Cubro are supporting Deborah to come join us for the day. She is very excited about the prospect and wants us to work her to the bone, which we will!

    in reply to: Maternity question #3861
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Good question Jo, I believe every birthing pool should have a ceiling track above it. Its the only way to get the mother out of either she or the baby are in trouble safely. It is also documented on page 273 of the guidelines ‘birthing pools need ceiling tracking above for handling and emergency evacuations’. Ive yet to see one but should an emergency happen the precedent has been set by the guidelines.

    in reply to: Mandatory Training #3556
    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi Angela and Leona
    The information on the Worksafe is a cut and paste from the original 2012 document and this is far more detailed and robust. You can find it at the end of that section or here is the link https://www.acc.co.nz/assets/provider/acc6075-moving-and-handling-people-guidelines.pdf
    Thanks
    Anne

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)