Manual handling training for doctors?

This topic contains 16 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Angela Greetham 6 months, 2 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #2870

    Michelle Nevil
    Participant

    Hi Wondering if anyone has developed or is involved in manual handling education for doctors?
    I have been asked to fill a gap in their education timetable and will address the key principles, risk assessment and correct body mechanics. Demonstrate safe techniques, with transfers that they may be involved in such as PAT slide transfer and discuss the benefits of air-assisted devices.
    Any other thoughts???

  • #2873

    Yvonne Harris
    Participant

    Hello Michelle,

    CMDHB have completed the TROPHI Ax to assess our whole manual handling resources, skills etc.

    Training was of course a huge issue for us to deal with. We have started to put together a team of people. Waitemata DHB do have robust training systems. Anne McMahon is the person to contact there.

    • #2892

      Michelle Nevil
      Participant

      Thank you Yvonne.
      I will look into the TROPHI AX and wait to here from Anne.

    • #2893

      Does anyone know how do I get a copy of the TROPHI Ax?

  • #2874

    Hi Michelle
    At our DHB our new doctors do the same manual handling session as our nursing staff at Orientation, this only started this year.

    • #2890

      Michelle Nevil
      Participant

      What DHB do you work at?
      How many hours is the orientation training?
      Thanks,
      Michelle

    • #2896

      Hi Michelle

      SCDHB and unfortunately it’s only 2hrs. It overs patslides, slide sheets, hoists, LITE principle, sit to stand, communication, pushing vs pulling. Its a lot to get through.

      Angela

  • #2888

    Kate Edmond
    Participant

    I have developed a one page elearning for the Drs, however I doubt they do it. I did run a session with the anaesthetists at their monthly in-service. We are reviewing our training currently and I will be pushing for them to be included. Kate Edmond ccdhb

    • #2891

      Michelle Nevil
      Participant

      Thanks Kate, was your training to the anaesthetists centred around lateral transfers and air-assisted devices?

  • #2894

    Yvonne Harris
    Participant

    Hi Michelle,

    I have spoken to Dana Ralph-Smith who introduced the TROPHI process to CMH. This is her response:

    We have accessed it via one of the co-authors of the tool Dr Mike Fray
    M.J.Fray@lboro.ac.uk
    I am happy to talk to anyone about it after they chat with Mike
    Kind regards

    Dana Ralph-Smith
    General Manager I Adult Rehabilitation and Health of Older People
    ____________________________________________________________________

    T: + 64 9 276 0044, Ext: 52069 | M: + 64 021495518
    Dana.Ralph-Smith@middlemore.co.nz
    Middlemore Hospital I 100 Hospital Road, Otahuhu I Private Bag 93311 Otahuhu, Auckland 1640
    countiesmanukau.health.nz I COUNTIES MANUKAU DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD

  • #2895

    Anne McMahon
    Participant

    Hi
    To clarify, during consultation with the Counties M&H steering group, we were asked to implement the Waitemata DHB M&H programme there. I recommended a base line measurement of the organisations M&H status, via the TROPHI tool, pre-implementation. I would urge any organisation to do this before any major intervention for M&H is planned. After connecting Dr Mike Fray with the Counties team, led by Dana, the TROPHI tool was introduced, carried out in 14 clinical areas and results were analysed by Mike. The next stage is underway and the implementation of the Waitemata programme starts in August. Training for Counties Staff goes live in September, with our support during the transitional stage and ongoing. Counties will be implementing all of WDHBs M&H tools, documents and practises in a gradual planned process.

    The TROPHI tool will then be repeated, analysed by Mike and can inform us of both progress or lack of it and where the gaps remain. The benefits are multiple but for at least a basic start, staff transitioning from one DHB to the other won’t need to be either retrained or be convinced of a differing set of practises just because of geography!

    As we know relying purely on Staff injury information does not give us the basis for either investment for improvements or the real impact of doing little or nothing. The TROPHI tool can help change this with actual evidence gathered through measuring and analysing the data from the 12 key focus tools. It is also an opportunity to highlight the absence of a whole professional group in managing this hazard for themselves and others. Evidence is what drs will expect to convince the profession as a whole to be part of this.

    I feel this could be further strengthened in the additional measurement of the financial, ethical and overall health benefits for patients. Plus stronger integration of the currently siloed areas of pressure injury prevention, falls and early recovery and earlier discharge care.

    Dr Mike Fray is joining us for the whole MHANZ roadshow in November and will be presenting on this specific project as well as other topics. We are very lucky to have him so please encourage and advertise attendance. We and Counties intend to have some feedback of where we are at and what’s next. MHANZ was integral to the introduction of the M&H post grad cert at AUT. The content and premise is based on Dr Fray’s at Loughborough University in the UK.
    Establishing our credibility in this practise is crucial in lieu of any standards or regulation from MoH, unions or professional bodies.

    Finally from me personally, developing a national programme has been my lofty aim for nearly 13 years. A programme that could also be measured on both the sucess or failure of its interventions and then tweaked accordingly, can only be good for us as an industry. It can only benefit patients who are ultimately also us and every other person in New Zealand. We have to stop diluting and confusing our messages or philosophies if we want to progress M&H to the level of professionalism it should be at.
    Only when have this can we expect to fully integrate M&H into all professions and environments in health and social care. Embedding M&H practise into the training and practise of Drs, I think, will be a national issue but a crucial one. Again having a clear evidence based programme can only help strengthen the argument.

    Apologies for the giant message! 🙂

  • #2916

    Michelle Nevil
    Participant

    This is awesome news. I look forward to hearing more about it at the road show. Thanks Anne

  • #2950

    Kate Browne
    Participant

    Hi Michelle,

    I provide training for anaesthetic techs and other theatre staff but would fall over backwards if any of the specialists showed up!
    That’s great news to hear you are getting the chance to get the ears of the anaethetists at their monthly meeting.

    If I had that opportinuty I would be reinforcing the importance of their role in providing effective coordination of any patient handling including transfers or any repositioning to ensure the patient and their teams safety.
    This is because many of them don’t wait for the staff to prepare for the transfer and rush into the call to move,
    or don’t take it seriously and change the timing or words used in the transfer which can lead to an uncorodinated transfer resulting in staff being injured.
    In our hospitals they are also involved in bed transport of the patient between theatre and recovery/PACU so this woul dalso be a n opportunity to include bed height adjustment, and working together in a coordinated fashion with the person steering the bed to prevent body strain.

    The anaesthetic techs assume sustained awkward postures so as well as including lateral transfers and interoperative repostioning, we also focus on self care techniques including reverse postural stretches.
    We discuss varying their positions when able, using the table to rest as much of their body as possible,
    and emphasise the need to ask and take breaks from their positions where ever possible.
    Also varying their roles throughout their shift to avoid accumulative body stress.

    All the best in your endeavours
    Kate

  • #2951

    Fiona Trevelyan
    Participant

    Hi Everyone

    Just so that you are aware, TROPHI is a moving and handling audit tool taught as part of the health ergonomics postgraduate papers currently offered at AUT, the content of which was set up with significant input from Mike Fray, ACC and Anne McMahon in 2014. The aim of the AUT programme is to offer a postgraduate qualification in NZ (based on the Loughborough University model) that enables persons employed in moving and handling advisory positions within healthcare to upskill in human factors and ergonomics related areas. The postgraduate papers includes topics (amongst others): health and safety legislation, basic anatomy and biomechanics, risk assessment tools for patient handling (e.g. TROPHI) and object handling (e.g. risk reckoner, MAC), user trials, intervention strategy and evaluation. Please let me know if you would like any additional information about any of the above.
    Kind regards
    Dr Fiona Trevelyan fiona.trevelyan@aut.ac.nz or 09 9219999 ext 7142

  • #3357

    Kate Edmond
    Participant

    Placing someone in the prone position with a hovermatt is a good techqniue for surgeons to know. You could get Fletcher suckling from Active health care to help out.

  • #3868

    Angela Greetham
    Participant

    Hi Michelle,
    The BOPDHB do not train any doctors/medical team in moving and handling techniques, but we do have a system set up with the theatre staff that performs a 3 monthly training session for all. I have 2 dedicated champions who work in theatre and recovery who help with theses sessions. We show the staff the Hover Products, slings and techniques for pronging, using the spinal table and lateral transfers.
    Thanks,
    Angela

  • #3869

    Angela Greetham
    Participant

    sorry spelt prone wrong!!!!

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